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July 23, 2018

AR & VR in Recruitment: Is it worth a shot?

Business spending on VR will reach $9.2 billion by the year 2021.  

Cooper Fitch Dubai
Cooper Fitch Dubai
Cooper Fitch Dubai
Cooper Fitch Dubai

 

Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) are getting all the hype as organisations are trying to implement them in their business and the recruitment field is not an exception. According to a recent research conducted by Tractica, business spending on VR will reach $9.2 billion by the year 2021.  

Virtual reality allows human beings to experience a simulated situation. Augmented reality is a technology that was introduced as a prototype in the early 1990s and it superimposes a digitized image into a real-life situation.

Interviewing Process

Taking the help of VR and AR during the interviewing process can be perceived as time-saving. Taking the candidates through a journey in the digital space might not yield the required results that recruiters are looking for. Using these technologies will take away the value that recruitment specialists and consultants can provide. In other words, as a recruitment consultant, it is my job to meet with the candidates, ascertain their cultural fit, their work ethics, their management style and what kind of management structure can they effectively work under. From my experience, putting potential candidates under the screening of a technology will not provide inclusive or conclusive results.

If we rely on a machine to assess how a candidate reacts in a certain situation, we might not be able to assess the strengths or soft skills of the candidates as a machine will never have the same level of genuine understanding that we have as human beings.

Cannot defy reality

If we rely on a machine to assess how a candidate reacts in a certain situation, we might not be able to assess the strengths or soft skills as a machine will never have the same level of genuine understanding that we have as human beings. During an interview process, a lot of meticulous evaluation takes place. For instance, when a prospective candidate is to be interviewed, we ensure they undergo an interview process with different consultants as people react differently to different people. Taking the help of a VR or AR will not allow us to understand how the candidate reacts to different personality types. A machine will assess the candidate from one scenario perspective without any human involvement which will not give us the needed feedback.

Benefits for organisations

While these technologies might not be very accurate in interviewing or screening processes, they can be beneficial in other ways. From a candidate’s experience, it is extremely useful as it will allow them to see what a day in the office will be like without causing any disruption to the employees. PWC has implemented a “you visit” virtual reality (VR) video tour which allows the candidates to take a virtual tour into their office. Similarly, using such technologies to train candidates and help them understand the office culture can be beneficial. Recruitment agencies deal with a number of different clients on daily basis. Implementing or embedding data into VR or AR based on the client’s needs and work culture in order to test the candidates will be unfruitful due to the time and cost it requires.

A big wave is created around embedding technologies in recruitment services; however, a machine cannot be trusted to evaluate a human being. No matter how realistic VR or AR might be, the user will always be aware in their subconscious that the preordained situations they are getting exposed to are not real which will make their reactions unassessable due to their inaccuracy. Recruitment is a human-based field and nothing can take the place of an experienced recruiter when it comes to evaluating another human being.

Dale McKerrell By Dale McKerrell

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